Supervised Machine Learning for Fake News Detection

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In this project, we have created a Supervised Machine Learning Model for Fake News Detection based on three different algorithms:

  • Naive Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Gradient Boosting (XGBoost).



The final results of this project are:

  • http://gofaaas.sinfronteras.ws/fakeNewsDetector: This Web Application is a practical GUI to easily interact with the Machine Learning Models created. It allows to determine if a News Article is Fake or Reliable by entering the text into a input field. The input text will be processed by our Machine Learning Models at the back-end and the result will be sent back to the client. This Web App was created using Shiny, an R package that can be used to build interactive web apps straight from R.
  • https://github.com/adeloaleman/RFakeNewsDetector: This repository contains a R Library that was created in order to package the Machine Learning Models created. This package contains essentially three functions: modelNB(), modelSVM() and modelXGBoost(). These functions take a news article as argument and (using the Models created) return the authenticity tag («fake (1)» or «reliable (0)»):
    • modelNB(): Based on the the Naive Bayes Model.
    • modelSVM(): Based on the Support Vector Machine Model.
    • modelXGBoost(): Based on the Extreme Gradient Boosting Model.



The accuracy of the model:

  • The Machine Learning Model created (using the Gradient Boosting algorithm) was able to determine the reliability of News Articles with an accuracy of 78.86%. In Figure 5 we show the accuracy we got for all the models created.



What we call Fake News in this project:

  • Deliberately distorted information that secretly leaked into the communication process in order to deceive and manipulate (Vladmir Bitman).
Therefore, our Machine Learning Models are only able to detect this kind of disinformation: Fake News Articles that were deliberately created in order to deceive and manipulate



Problem: Classify News articles as fake or reliable

We are facing a Text classification problem. We want to classify News articles as «fake (1)» or «reliable (0)».

The function that we want to build can be expressed this way:

Where is the text of the article we want to verify its authenticity.



Solution: Supervised Machine Learning

We are implementing a Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm to build a Model (function) that will take an Input Text (the news article) and will return an Output Tag: «fake (1)» or «reliable (0)».



Supervised Learning

  • Is the task of learning a function (the model) from labeled training data. The training data consists of a set of input-output pairs. We call it labeled data because we know the output (target variable)
  • In our case, the input is the text of the news article and the output is the authenticity tag («fake (1)» or «reliable (0)»).
  • The Function obtained will be used for mapping new inputs. In other words, the function will return the authenticity tag («fake (1)» or «reliable (0)») for new input data (not labeled news articles).


Figure 1: Supervised Learning Model. Figure modified from https://monkeylearn.com/text-classification/



The training dataset

In this project we used 4 different labeled fake news datasets, we called them:

  • Kaggle Fake News Dataset 1
  • Kaggle Fake News Dataset 2
  • Victoria University Dataset
  • Gofaaas Dataset: This is a small (511 news articles) but very trustworthy dataset. It has been built by our team in order to have reliable data that will be used as Test data to validate the models built with other datasets.

The 3 first datasets were built for similar fake news detector projects and are available online.


To simplify the explanations of the process followed to train our model, consider the example data schema shown in Figure 2. This will be our training data from which our Machine Learning Algorithm will build the Classification Function (the Model). Each input-output pair (News Article - Lable) will be used for the algorithm to learn the writing styles of Fake or Reliable news articles.




Datasets used

.



Kaggle Fake News Dataset 1

https://www.kaggle.com/c/fake-news/data


Distribution of the data:

The distribution of Stance classes in train_stances.csv is as follows:

rows unrelated discuss agree disagree
49972 0.73131 0.17828 0.0736012 0.0168094



Kaggle Fake News Dataset 2

https://www.kaggle.com/jruvika/fake-news-detection



Victoria University Dataset

.



Gofaaas Fake News Dataset

.



How to calculate the accuracy of the Model

The accuracy of the model is a measure used to evaluate how well the model is working. In our case, our model is used to classify news articles as «fake (1)» or «reliable (0)». Therefore, to calcualte the accurancy we have to compare the results returnned for the Model with the labels of the news article.


For example, consider the data shown in Figure 2:

  • Suppose that we build a Machine Learning Model using the 70% of this data. Our model has learned the writing style of a fake or reliable news article based on the input-output pairs of the training data.
  • Then we used the Model created to classify the articles of the 30% of this data that has been reserved as Test data.
  • Because it is a labeled data, we know that the authenticity tag of the 3 articles of our Test data example are: 0, 1, 1 (reliable, fake, fake)
  • Now, supose that our Machine Learning Model return 0, 0, 1 when classifying these 3 news articles of the Test data.
  • So, two out of the three classifications that the model has performed were correct. We can therefore calculate the accuracy as:




Procedure to build the Supervised Machine Learning Model

Because one of the goals of this project is to evaluate performance of different algorithms, we built models for each dataset using 3 algorithms:

  • Naive Bayes (NB): Implemented through the e1071 R Library
  • Support vector machine (SVM): We used the RTextTools R Library, which depends on e1071.
  • Gradient Boosting (XGB): Implemented using the xgboost R Library.


So, we obtained 3 Models for each dataset:

  • Kaggle Fake News Dataset 1:
  • Model_NB
  • Model_ SVM
  • Model_ XGB
  • The same for the other datasets


In this section, we explain the procedure followed to build the XGBoost Model using the Victoria University Dataset. In Figure 5, we summarize the results obtained for each dataset.

The Models were built following these steps:

  1. Splitting the Dataset into Training and Test data
  2. Cleaning the data
  3. Building the Document-Term Matrix
  4. Running the Machine Learning Algorithm to create the model
  5. Using the model_XGB to classify news articles and calculating the accuracy of the model
  6. Cross validation



Splitting the Dataset into Training and Test data

  • 70% of the dataset will be used as Train data: The model will be built using this portion of the data.
  • 30% of the dataset will be used as Test data: We will use the model build using the 70% of the dataset to classify the 30% that hasn't been used to train the model. This will allows us to calculate the accuracy of the classification made with our model. We will explain later how the accuracy is calculated.
# =============================================================================== =
# Splitting the data into Train and Test data ----
# =============================================================================== =
# Randomly Taking the 70% of the rows (70% records will be used for training  sampling without replacement. The remaining 30% will be used for testing)
samp_id = sample(1:nrow(data),              # do ?sample to examine the sample() func
                 round(nrow(data)*traindata_percentage),
                 replace = F)
train = data[samp_id,]                      # 70% of training data set, examine struc of samp_id obj
test  = data[-samp_id,]                     # remaining 30% of training data set



Cleaning the data

We need to take everything that doesn't contribute to the analysis out of the data before run the algorithm. The cleaning of the data used in this project includes:

  • Convert to lower-case letters.
  • Remove punctuation.
  • Remove numbers.
  • Remove blank space
  • Remove stopwords: Stop words are commonly used words (a, an, and, the, this, those). The reason why stop words should be removed is that we can focus on the words that really differentiate the articles and not the the words that are in all the articles.
  • Stemming Words: Trimming words suchs calling, called and calls to call.
# =============================================================================== =
# Cleaning the data ----
# =============================================================================== =

text <- data$text

text <- tolower(text)
text <- removePunctuation(text)
text <- removeNumbers(text)
text <- removeWords(text, stopwords("en"))    # stopwords
text <- stripWhitespace(text)                 # Remove blank space
text <- wordStem(text, language = "english")  # Stemming Words



Building the Document-Term Matrix

To be able to run a Machine Learning algorithm, we first need to transform each news article into a numerical representation in the form of a vector. In Figure 3, we show how to build the Document-Term Matrix. This matrix will be the numerical representation that a Machine Learning algorithm is able to understand. As you can see, each columns of this matrix represent a word in the training data. Thus, each document is defined by the frequency of the words that are in the dictionary composed for all the terms in our data.


# =============================================================================== =
# Building the Document-Term Matrix ----
# =============================================================================== =

# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# * Train data ----
# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# Vocabulary of tokens for the train data
# Tokenize the text and create a vocabulary of tokens including document counts
vocab_train <- create_vocabulary(itoken(text_train,
                                        preprocessor = tolower,
                                        tokenizer    = word_tokenizer))
saveRDS(vocab_train, file = vocab_train_filename)


# Document-term matrix for the train data
dtm_train_xgb <- create_dtm(itoken(text_train,
                                   preprocessor = tolower,
                                   tokenizer    = word_tokenizer),
                            vocab_vectorizer(vocab_train))


# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# * Test data ----
# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# Vocabulary of tokens for the test data
vocab_test <- create_vocabulary(itoken(text_test,
                                       preprocessor = tolower,
                                       tokenizer    = word_tokenizer))


# Document-term matrix for the test data ----
dtm_test_xgb <- create_dtm(itoken(text_test,
                                  preprocessor = tolower,
                                  tokenizer    = word_tokenizer),
                           vocab_vectorizer(vocab_train))



Running the Machine Learning Algorithm to create the model

This is the point where we create the function using a Machine Learning Algorithm.

  • First we need to add the labels to our DTM to create the Matrix that we pass to the xgboost function.
  • We implement a decision trees based XGBoosting using the followint parameters:
  • objective = "binary:logistic" : To train a binary classification model (this is the case of fake news detection).
  • max.depth = 7 : Maximum depth of a tree.
  • eta = 0.01 : Step size shrinkage used in update to prevents overfitting.
  • nrounds = 10000 : The number of rounds for boosting.
  • The model created with the xgboost function has been saved into the model_XGB variable. This model will be used later to classify new data.
# =============================================================================== =
# Xgboost model building ----
# =============================================================================== =

# Turn the DTM into an XGB matrix using the labels that are to be learned ----
xgbMatrix_train <- xgb.DMatrix(dtm_train_xgb, label = labels_train)


# Parameters for xgboost
xgb_params = list(
  objective = "binary:logistic",
  eta = 0.01,
  max.depth = max_depth,
  eval_metric = "auc")


# Creating the «xgb model» obj ----
system.time(
  # model_xgb <- xgboost(data = xgbMatrix_train, params = xgb_params, nrounds = 10000, print_every_n = 500)
  model_XGB <- xgboost(data = xgbMatrix_train, params = xgb_params, nrounds = setNrounds, print_every_n = setPrintEvery)
)
saveRDS(model_XGB, file = model_XGB_filename)



Using the model_XGB to classify news articles and calculating the accuracy of the model

Now that we have a Model, we can use it to classify new data. Remember that we count with the lables of the data (fake (1) or reliable (0)). So, the goal is verify the accuracy of the model by comparing the results returnned for the model_XGB with the true labels.

# =============================================================================== =
#  Classifying data using the model created and displaying a Confusion matrix ----
# =============================================================================== =

# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# * Train data ----
# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# Create our prediction probabilities
pred_prob_train_XGB <- predict(model_XGB, dtm_train_xgb)

# Set our cutoff
pred_train_XGB <- ifelse(pred_prob_train_XGB >= 0.5, 1, 0)
saveRDS(pred_train_XGB, file = pred_train_XGB_filename)

# Create the confusion matrix
# https://rpubs.com/mharris/multiclass_xgboost
cm_train_XGB <- confusionMatrix(factor(pred_train_XGB), factor(labels_train), positive="1")
saveRDS(cm_train_XGB, file = cm_train_XGB_filename)


# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# * Test data ----
# ---------------------------------------------------------------- -
# Create our prediction probabilities
pred_prob_test_XGB <- predict(model_XGB, dtm_test_xgb)

# Set our cutoff
pred_test_XGB <- ifelse(pred_prob_test_XGB >= 0.5, 1, 0)
saveRDS(pred_test_XGB, file = pred_test_XGB_filename)

# Create the confusion matrix
cm_test_XGB <- confusionMatrix(factor(pred_test_XGB), factor(labels_test), positive="1")
saveRDS(cm_test_XGB, file = cm_test_XGB_filename)



Train Accuracy

Train Accuracy: The accuracy of the Model over the Training data.


A first measure of the accuracy of the model can be calculated by classifying the same data that has been used to build the model. Our Model must perform very well when classifying this data.

This accuracy doesn't really give a good measure of the efficiency of the model to classify new data, but it is used to validate that the algorithm has been correctly implemented. It is expected to get an accuracy close to 100% when using the classifying the Train data.

In Figure 4, we show the accuracy and Confussin Matrix we got over the Training data. We got 100% of accuracy over the Training data.



Test Accuracy

Test Accuracy: The accuracy of the Model over the Test data.


A second measure of the accuracy of the model is calculated by classifying the news articles of our Test Data. This data was not used to build the Model. So, the resuls of the classification over the Test Data give a us a good measure of the accuracy of the model.

When we used the Test data to calculate the accurancy, it must be notice that, even if the Test data was not used to build our model, it comes from the same dataset of our Training data. It is therefore very likely that the news articles come from similar sources and have a similar writing style. That is why, when calculating the accuracy using the Test data (from the same dataset), it is also expected to get a good accuracy.

We got an accuracy of 99% when classifying the 30% of the Victoria University dataset that was reserved as Test data. See the results and Confusion Matrix is shown in Figure 4.



The accuracy of the Model over another dataset

The accuracy of the Model over the Gofaaas Dataset.


The best measure of the accurancy of a model, is the one calculated by classifying data that is not related at all with the dataset used to build the model. In this project we use the Gofaaas Dataset as our final Test data.

We will later discuss carefully the results of the accuracy we got. For now, notice that we got an accuracy of 78% when using the model built with the Victoria University Dataset to classify the articles of our Gofaaas Dataset.


  • Train accuracy.
  • Test accuracy.
  • Accuracy over the Gofaaas Dataset.

Figure 4: Accuracy and Confusion Matrix of the model built using the XGBoost algorithm and the Vicory University Dataset.



Summary of results and Analysis

In Figure 5, we have summirised the resuls of all the models built in the project.


We built models for each dataset using three different algorithms:

  • Regarding the Test accuracy when classifying the reserved Test data from the same dataset Notice that:
  • We got very good accuracies for almost all the models built.
  • The best accuracies was obtained with the XGBoost algorithm.
  • We got above 97% using xgboost for the 3 external datasets and 83.66% for the Gofaaas Dataset. It was expected a lower accuracy for the Gofaaas dataset because it is composed only for 511 News articles.
  • We got a bad accuracy only in the Naive Bayes Model created with the Kaglle Fake News Dataset 1 and 2.


  • Regarding the Test accuracy when classifying data from another dataset:
  • This is the mos important result of our project. As we already mentioned, the best measure of the accuracy of a model, is the one calculated by classifying data that is not related with the dataset used to build the model.
  • In this project we used the Gofaaas Dataset as our final Test data. This is an important aspect of our work, because the Gofaaas Dataset was built by our team in order to ensure that we have reliable data that to validate the models built with other datasets.
  • We created 2 final models that have been using to classify the data of the Gofaaas Dataset:
  • Final Model 1: This model was built by using 3 datasets combined: Kaggle Fake News Datasets 1 and 2 and the Victoria University Dataset.
  • Fianal Model 2: This model was built using the Victoria University Dataset (Training data: 100%).
  • We got 73.97% and 78.86% accuracy using Final Model 1 and Final Model 2, respectively. We can not say that they are excellent accuracies (we generally look for values above 80); but we can say that, especially the 78.87% accuracy, is a value that we think is very acceptable for a first Version 1.0 of a Fake News Detector Project.


Algorithm R Package Accuracy
Kaggle Fake News Dataset 1 Kaggle Fake News Dataset Victoria University Datase Gofaaas Fake News Datase Final Model 1: Combination of the 3 Datasets Final Model 2: Victoria University Dataset
20,800 News articles 4,009 News articles 35,309 News articles 511 News articles 60,118 News articles 35,309 News articles
Data split ratio:

Train data: 70%

Test data: 30%

Data split ratio:

Train data: 70%

Test data: 30%

Data split ratio:

Train data: 70%

Test data: 30%

Data split ratio:

Train data: 70%

Test data: 30%

Data split ratio:

Train data: 100%

Data split ratio:

Train data: 100%

Train Accuracy Test Accuracy Train Accuracy Test Accuracy Train Accuracy Test Accuracy Train Accuracy Test Accuracy Train Accuracy Test Accuracy

(Tested over the Gofaaas Dataset)

Train Accuracy Test Accuracy

(Tested over the Gofaaas Dataset)

Naive Bayes e1071 72.03% 72.02% 80.90% 78.80% 97.93% 97.95% 92.74% 81.05% 86.06% 67.12%
Support vector machine We used RTextTools, which depends on e1071 99.74% 94.33% 99.57% 93.43% 99.97% 99.17% 100% 75.16% 99.57% 59.69%
Extreme Gradient Boosting xgboost 99.97% 97.13% 100% 98.25% 100% 99.80% 100% 83.66% 99.99% 73.97% 100% 78.86%



Fake News Detector R Library

After all the work done training the models and analyse the results obtained, we needed to create a R function that takes a News article as argument and (using the Models created) return the authenticity tag («fake (1)» or «reliable (0)»).


This R function takes a news article as argument and using the XGBoost model created from the combination of the 3 datasets return the authenticity tag («fake (1)» or «reliable (0)»):

#' modelXGBoost Function
#'
#' This function allows you to check if a news article is authentic or fake.
#' It was trained using the xgboost package and the the Kaggle Fake News Dataset
#' @param fileName 
#' @export
#' @examples
#' modelXGBoost(FileName)
#' @import xgboost
#' @import tm
#' @import text2vec
#' @import tools
#' @import SnowballC
#' @importFrom readr read_file


modelXGBoost <- function(fileName){
  
  if(class(fileName) == "character" && length(fileName) == 1) {
    if(file.exists(fileName)){
      if(file_ext(fileName) == "txt"){
        data  <- data.frame(read_file(fileName))
        names(data)[1] <- "text"
      }else if(file_ext(fileName) == "csv"){
        data  <- data.frame(readLines(fileName))
        names(data)[1] <- "text"
      }else{
        print('The extension of the file entered is not supported.
               Make sure the file you are trying to read have a supported extension (.txt or .csv)')
      }
    } else{
      print("Warning!! The parameter you have entered it is NOT a valid path for a text file.
             The function is analysing the text contained in the «character» object you have entered as parameter.")
      data <- data.frame(fileName)
      names(data)[1] <- "text"
    }
  }else{
    print("Warning!! The parameter you have entered it is NOT a valid path for a file.
           The function is analysing the text contained in the object you have entered as parameter.")
    data <- data.frame(fileName)
    names(data)[1] <- "text"
  }
  
  
  # Text pre-processing ----
  text <- data$text
  
  text <- tolower(text)
  text <- removePunctuation(text)
  text <- removeNumbers(text)
  text <- removeWords(text, stopwords("en"))               # stopwords
  text <- stripWhitespace(text)                            # Remove blank space
  text <- SnowballC::wordStem(text, language = "english")  # Stemming Words
  
  
  # Building the document-term matrix using the tokenized review text. This returns a dgCMatrix object ----
  dtm <- create_dtm(itoken(text,
                           preprocessor = tolower,
                           tokenizer    = word_tokenizer),
                    vocab_vectorizer(vocab_train))
  
  pred_prob <- predict(model_XGB, dtm)
  
  pred <- ifelse(pred_prob >= 0.5, 1, 0)
  
  return(pred)

}